Monday, January 16, 2017

8:75

Salaam all,


8:75
وَالَّذِينَ آمَنُواْ مِن بَعْدُ وَهَاجَرُواْ وَجَاهَدُواْ مَعَكُمْ فَأُوْلَـئِكَ مِنكُمْ وَأُوْلُواْ الأَرْحَامِ بَعْضُهُمْ أَوْلَى بِبَعْضٍ فِي كِتَابِ اللّهِ إِنَّ اللّهَ بِكُلِّ شَيْءٍ عَلِيمٌ

Waallatheena amanoo min baAAdu wahajaroo wajahadoo maAAakum faolaika minkum waoloo alarhami baAAduhum awla bibaAAdin fee kitabi Allahi inna Allaha bikulli shayin AAaleemun

The Aya says:
And those who became faithful after that and migrated and struggled with you (plural), then those are of you. And the relatives some of them are more deserving of some in Allah’s book. Indeed, Allah, in everything knowing.

My personal note:
The term oloo AlArham is literally translated the ones of the womb and is an idiomatic expression for blood relatives. The Aya does mention that relatives should take care of each other and be responsible for each other as a matter of obligation as long as there is no important blocker of this system.

Translation of the transliterated words:
Waallatheena: and those who
Amanoo: made themselves safe/ attained faith
Note: the root is Hamza-M-N and it means safe or safety. AMANOO is an action that is derived from the root and that is completed. It means: the action of making the object (not mentioned and therefore the subject and the object can be the same entity here) become safe happened by the subject (third person plural). So, it ends up meaning: they made themselves safe.
Min: from
baAAdu: after
Wahajaroo: and migrated/ left behind/ abandoned (their old place and people).
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA is often translated as an addition (and), but inclusion probably covers the meaning a little better. HAJAROO is derived from the root H-J-R and it means leaving or abandoning someone or something or some place and so forth. HAJAROO is an interactive action that is completed. It means: the action of leaving behind an undeclared object (the context suggests the place and people they were with) happened in an interactive fashion by the subject (third person plural).

wajahadoo : and exerted effort opposite resistance/ and strived against odds.
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA is often translated as an addition (and), but inclusion probably covers the meaning a little better. . JAHADOO is derived from the root J-H-D and it means exerting effort. JAHADOO is the third person plural past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This is an interactive verb and it means they exert effort opposite resistance. This is a wide meaning and one of them may include fighting. However the resistance can come in all forms including psychological and personal.
maAAakum: with you (plural)
faolaika: then those
minkum: of you (plural)
waoloo: and the people of
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA is often translated as an addition (and), but inclusion probably covers the meaning a little better. OLOO is derived from the root Hamza-W-L and it means ultimate as a concept and takes different shapes and specific meanings according to the situation including first and so on. It often takes the meaning of first because that is the most ultimate. OLOO in this context are the people who ultimately relate to each other based on the concept that comes next.
Alarhami: the wombs
Note: the root is R-Ha-M and it means womb in concrete. This term is used to mean mercy and all the good that the womb provides. ALARHAM means the wombs. So the term oloo Alarham is pointing to people who are blood relatives to each other.
baAAduhum: some of them
Note: the root is B-Ain-Dhad and it means part of the whole. BaAADU means part of or some of. HUM means them
Awla: more deserving/ more appropriate
Note: the root is Hamza-W-L and it means ultimate as a concept and takes different shapes and specific meanings according to the situation. AWLA means more deserving to be in the front in the sense.
bibaAAdin: in some
Note: BI signifies an attachment or close linkage between what is before and what is after it. In a Verbal sentence it can mean attachment to the action or to the subject as it does the action. This attachment can then signify many things according to the verb and to the sentence and so on. BaAADIN is derived from the root B-Ain-Dhad and it means part of the whole. BaAADIN means some.
Fee: in
Kitabi: book of
Note: KITAB is derived from the root K-T-B and it means putting things together as in grouping the herd together or closing the lips or writing (the most common use), because in writing, one puts the letters and the ideas together. KITABI means, the process of writing or the book or anything related to it from the ideas to the ink and paper to the place where all is put together. KITABI means book of.

Allahi: Allah
Inna: indeed
Allaha: Allah
Bikulli: in every/ by every
Note: BI signifies an attachment or close linkage between what is before and what is after it. In a Verbal sentence it can mean attachment to the action or to the subject as it does the action. This attachment can then signify many things according to the verb and to the sentence and so on. KULLI is derived from the root K-L-L and it means the parts put together. This is the concrete and it means all or every or each. It can also be extended conceptually to mean the parts surrounding an entity. KULLI means every, or each.
shayin: thing/ thing
Note: the root is SH-Y-Hamza and it means entity. SHAYIN means entity. It is taken here to mean a thing or entity
AAaleemun : knowledgeable/ knowing
Note: the root is Ain-L-M and it means knowing/knowledge or knowledge of facts. AAaLEEM is the one that is very knowledgeable

Salaam all and have a great day

Hussein

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