Sunday, November 06, 2005

2:184

Salaam all,

This is 2:184
أَيَّامًا مَّعْدُودَاتٍ فَمَن كَانَ مِنكُم مَّرِيضًا أَوْ عَلَى سَفَرٍ فَعِدَّةٌ مِّنْ أَيَّامٍ أُخَرَ وَعَلَى الَّذِينَ يُطِيقُونَهُ فِدْيَةٌ طَعَامُ مِسْكِينٍ فَمَن تَطَوَّعَ خَيْرًا فَهُوَ خَيْرٌ لَّهُ وَأَن تَصُومُواْ خَيْرٌ لَّكُمْ إِن كُنتُمْ تَعْلَمُونَ
Ayyaman maAAdoodatin faman kana minkum mareedan aw AAala safarin faAAiddatun min ayyamin okhara waAAala allatheena yuteeqoonahu fidyatun taAAamu miskeenin faman tatawwaAAa khayran fahuwa khayrun lahu waan tasoomoo khayrun lakum in kuntum taAAlamoon

The Aya says:
Counted days, so whoever was sick or traveling, therefore a count of other days. And on those that are unable to bear him (the fasting), feeding of a poor person as an exhange. So, whoever volunteers goodness, then it is better for him. And that you abstain/fast is a better choice to you if you knew.

My personal note:
The Aya gives the license for the people who are unable to fast/abstain. They can do it at another time. However, if that is impossible, then they have to free themselves of that obligation through the feeding of the poor.

The Aya mentions that the one that does things voluntarily is choosing well and that the better choice is fasting.

Translation of the transliterated words:
Ayyaman: Days
Note: the root is Y-W-M and it means day. AYYAM is a plural of day and therefore the meaning of the word is Days. The AN at the end is due to the grammatical place of the word in the sentence.
maAAdoodatin: counted/few
Note: the root is Ain-D-D and it means counting. MaAADOODAT is a word that is derived from the root that means counted and this gives the impression that they are not many days or not a long period of time. The IN at the end is a grammatical ending for the place of the sentence.
Faman: Therefore who
Kana: Was/arrived being
Note: the root is K-W-N and it means being. KANA is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the same root. This verb means literally, arrived being and in this situation, it carries the means was.
Minkum: from you (plural)/amongst you
Note MIN means from and in here is closer to meaning amongst.
Mareedan: sick/ill/not his full self
Note: the root is M-R-Dhad and it means literally a situation where someone or something is lacking from their being their full selves. In abstract it is used for illness or anything that makes for an imbalance. MAREED is the person that is ill or sick or that is not his/her complete self. The AN at the end is grammatical.
Aw: or
AAala: on
Safarin: Travel
Note: the root is S-F-R and it means sweeping something so that it becomes clear and apparent to the sight or exposed. The term is also used for travel because traveling makes the traveler exposed more clearly and it exposes the traveler to seeing other things more clearly. SAFAR means travel in this situation. The IN at the end is due to grammatical location.
faAAiddatun: therefore counting
Note: FA means therefore. IDDATUN is derived from the root Ain-D-D and it means counting. IDDATUN means counting of something.
Min: from
Ayyamin: Days
Note: the root is Y-W-M and it means day. AYYAM is a plural of day and therefore the meaning of the word is Days. The IN at the end is due to the grammatical place of the word in the sentence.
Okhara: remaining/other/coming later
Note: the root is Hamza-KH-R and it means remaining in time or place. When it comes to time, it means remaining or coming later or just other. OKHAR therefore means remaining/coming later or other.
waAAala: And on
allatheena: those that
yuteeqoonahu: cannot bear him (the fasting)/are unable to perform (fasting)
Note: the root is TTa-W-Qaf and it means ring around the neck as the necklace or anything that goes in a circle around something. This is the concrete word and the abstract meaning can mean capability of circling something and performing it if the person were the ones to put the ring around. Or, it can be difficulty to bear with something if the person were to have the ring around their neck. YUTEEQOONA is the third person plural present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. The verb means literally, make arrive ring/circling. HU means him and it points to the fasting. So, YUTEEQANAHOO would literally mean make arrive ring him which here means they made the ring of the fasting surround them, and that means they were not able to perform the fasting because to them it was difficult. This word is really difficult to translate.
Fidyatun: ransom/provide something to free them from this obligation
Note: the root is F-D-Y and it means ransoming for prisoners and captives or so. It is also used for freeing someone or something in exchange for something being offered instead. FIDYATUN is the ransoming or the offering of something to replace the obligation of the fasting.
taAAamu: feeding
Note: the root is TTa-Ain-M and it means anything that is eaten or put in the mouth. TaAAaMU is feeding or food.
Miskeenin: A poor person
Note: the root is S-K-N and it means Ashes which is the product of the end of the fire. The abstract meaning has many forms and it means rest or lack of movement, but it also means the lack or running out of energy. MIKEENIN is the person that does not have energy or ability to maneuver. This is used for the poor who have no ability to move out of that situation.
Faman: therefore who
tatawwaAAa: commenced performing the act in a loving and agreeing fashion/volunteers
Note: the root is Tta-W-Ain and it means performing an act agreeably and lovingly. This is used for abiding by an order or doing something voluntarily but also wanting to do it because of loving to do it. TATTAWaAAa is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means commenced at performing an act in a loving and agreeing fashion. The act is pointed to in the next word
Khayran: choice/good choice/goodness
Note: the root is KH-Y-R and it means choice. This word also means good because the good thing is a choice in itself. The AN at the end is due to grammatical location.
Fahuwa: therefore he.
Note: the HE is the act of goodness
Khayrun: choice/good choice/goodness
Note: the root is KH-Y-R and it means choice. This word also means good because the good thing is a choice in itself. The UN at the end is due to grammatical location.
Lahu: To him
Note: the him is the person, male or female, who does the good deed
Waan: and that
Tasoomoo: you fast/you abstain
Note: the root is Sad-Y-M and it means abstinence or abstaining. This includes any form of abstaining including food, drink, speech and so forth. The word is used to mean fasting during the month of Ramadan but this should include other forms of abstaining to maintain the spirituality of the person. TAOOMOO is the second person plural present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. The verb means, literally, you arrive fasting/abstaining. This, in turn means you fast/abstain.
Khayrun: choice/good choice/goodness
Note: the root is KH-Y-R and it means choice. This word also means good because the good thing is a choice in itself. The UN at the end is due to grammatical location.
Lakum: to you (plural)
In: if
Kuntum: you were/you arrived being
Note: the root is K-W-N and it means being. KUNTUM is the second person plural past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means, literally, arrived being or became being. This, in this situation, means you were.
taAAlamoon: knowing
Note: the root is Ain-L-M and it means knowledge or knowing. TaAALAMOON is the second person plural present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means arrive knowledge or become knowing. In this situation, because it comes after the you were, then it means knowing only.

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