Monday, November 21, 2005

2:187

Salaam all

This is 2:187
أُحِلَّ لَكُمْ لَيْلَةَ الصِّيَامِ الرَّفَثُ إِلَى نِسَآئِكُمْ هُنَّ لِبَاسٌ لَّكُمْ وَأَنتُمْ لِبَاسٌ لَّهُنَّ عَلِمَ اللّهُ أَنَّكُمْ كُنتُمْ تَخْتانُونَ أَنفُسَكُمْ فَتَابَ عَلَيْكُمْ وَعَفَا عَنكُمْ فَالآنَ بَاشِرُوهُنَّ وَابْتَغُواْ مَا كَتَبَ اللّهُ لَكُمْ وَكُلُواْ وَاشْرَبُواْ حَتَّى يَتَبَيَّنَ لَكُمُ الْخَيْطُ الأَبْيَضُ مِنَ الْخَيْطِ الأَسْوَدِ مِنَ الْفَجْرِ ثُمَّ أَتِمُّواْ الصِّيَامَ إِلَى الَّليْلِ وَلاَ تُبَاشِرُوهُنَّ وَأَنتُمْ عَاكِفُونَ فِي الْمَسَاجِدِ تِلْكَ حُدُودُ اللّهِ فَلاَ تَقْرَبُوهَا كَذَلِكَ يُبَيِّنُ اللّهُ آيَاتِهِ لِلنَّاسِ لَعَلَّهُمْ يَتَّقُونَ
Ohilla lakum laylata assiyami arrafathu ila nisaikum hunna libasun lakum waantum libasun lahunna AAalima Allahu annakum kuntum takhtanoona anfusakum fataba AAalaykum waAAafa AAankum falana bashiroohunna wabtaghoo ma kataba Allahu lakum wakuloo washraboo hatta yatabayyana lakumu alkhaytu alabyadu mina alkhayti alaswadi mina alfajri thumma atimmoo assiyama ila allayli wala tubashiroohunna waantum AAakifoona fee almasajidi tilka hudoodu Allahi fala taqrabooha kathalika yubayyinu Allahu ayatihi linnasi laAAallahum yattaqoon

The AYA says:
It was allowed for you (plural), the night of the fast/abstaining, the intimacy to your women. They are your clothing and you are their clothing. GOD knew that you were misleading yourselves, therefore HE arrived repentance on you and erased away from you (your fault). Therefore, now, mutually exchange skin embrace (in a sexual way), and desire what GOD allowed for you and eat and drink until the first light of dawn. Then, complete the fast/abstaining till the night. And do not exchange skin embrace while staying, in dedication, at the places of worship. Those are the limits set by GOD, therefore do not come near them. Similarly, the GOD makes clear and clarifying HIS signs to the people, perhaps they become conscious.

My Personal note:
This AYA allows people to have sex with their partners at night after the fast. Sex, in here means any act of intimacy with the partner. I do love the term BASHIEOOHUNNA which means your skin embracing their skin.

Translation of the transliterated words:
Ohilla: permitted
Note: the root is Ha-L-L and it means in concrete the milk expressed from an animal and the knot untied. In abstract, it gets the meaning of landing somewhere and of something being permitted. This is because for the milk to be expressed, it has to untie the knot that keeps it from being expressed, you have to be still for the landing and you have to allow someone to get the milk out (baby or milker). OHILLA is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means was made to arrive permission or was made to become permitted. This, in turn means permitted.
Lakum: To you (plural)
Laylata: night of
Note: the root is L-Y-L and it means night. LAYLATA means night of.
Assiyami: the fasting/the abstaining
Note: the root is Sad-Y-M and it means abstinence or abstaining. This includes any form of abstaining including food, drink, speech and so forth. The word is used to mean fasting during the month of Ramadan but this should include other forms of abstaining to maintain the spirituality of the person. ASSIYAMU is the abstaining practice or the abstinence and that includes the fasting.
Arrafathu: the intimate contact (as intercourse or other sexual contact)
Note: the root is R-F-Th and it means sexual or intimate contact. ALRAFATH is the intimate sexual contact that includes intercourse and otherwise.
Ila: To
Nisaikum: your women
Note: the root is a N-S-W and it means the sciatic nerve. This nerve was thought to be the origin of the leg in the Arabic thought. This could mean that women are named women because they are the origin of people since they are the ones that give birth. In any case NISA means women of. KUM means plural you. Therefore NISAIKUM means women of you (plural) and that means your women.
Hunna: They (plural feminine)
Libasun: Clothing
Note: the root is L-B-S and it means in concrete clothing or clothes. LIBASUN means clothing.
Lakum: to you/for you (plural you)
Waantum: And you (plural masculine)
Libasun: Clothing
Note: the root is L-B-S and it means in concrete clothing or clothes. LIBASUN means clothing.
Lahunna: to them/for them (plural feminine)
AAalima: knew
Note: the root is Ain-L-M and it means knowledge or knowing. AAaLIMA is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the root that means Arrived knowledge (to oneself in this situation) or became knowledgeable. This, in turn means knew.
Allahu: The GOD
Annakum: That you (plural)
Kuntum: Were/ became being
Note: the root is K-W-N and it means being. KUNTUM is the second person plural past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means became being (in this situation) or arrived being yourselves. This in turn means WERE.
Takhtanoona: mislead (in an interactive way)
Note: the root is KH-W-N and it means misleading or treason. TAKHTANOON is a second person plural present tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb is interactive and it literally means, misleading opposite misleading and this means misleading in an interactive fashion.
Anfusakum: yourselves
Note: the root is N-F-S and it means breath or breathing. This is the concrete and for other meanings it means self because the self breathes as well. ANFUSA are selves. KUM means plural you.
Fataba: Therefore he arrived ultimate return to GOD/repentance
Note: FA means Therefore. TABA is derived from the root T-W-B and the concrete word is TABOOT and that means the coffin. This makes T-W-B as the ultimate return to GOD in concrete as in death or in abstract as in ultimate repentance or ultimate return in repentance. TABA is the third person singular past tense that is derived from the root. This verb means arrived return/repentance to GOD or become returning to GOD. Because it is followed with the AAaLA after it, the meaning is arrived returning/repentance to GOD
AAalaykum: On you
waAAafa: And he erased
Note: WA means and. AAaFA is derived from the root Ain-F-W and it means erasing something through the effect of the wind. This is the concrete and in abstract it means erasing a fault from the record as in forgiving it or erasing something from one’s ownership as in giving it up to someone else. AAaFA is the third person singular past tens of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means literally, arrived erasing (of sin) or became erasing (of sin). Both, in turn, means erased.
AAankum: from you (plural)
Falana: therefore now.
Bashiroohunna: mutually proceed with skin embracing skin with them (sexual contact.)
Note: The root is B-SH-R and it means the outer smooth skin. This is the concrete and the abstract means good news, beauty and so forth. BASHIROO is the second person plural addressing males in a verb that is derived from the root. This verb is interactive and it means arrive skin opposite skin. This gives the impression that the two skins are touching each other in a mutually interactive form. This is a vision of sexual contact. HUNNA means them and it is plural feminine. So, BASHIROOHUNNA means mutually proceed with skin embracing skin with them.
Wabtaghoo: And desire to yourselves
Note: WA means and. IBTAGHOO is derived from the root B-GH-W and it means the young immature animal or the fruit that is not yet ready to pick. This in abstract, means desireable because of the youth and immature at other times or both. IBTAGHOO is the second person plural order form of a verb. This verb means literally, make arrive to yourselves desire. This, in turn means desire.
Ma: What
Kataba: wrote/has written/mandated/allowed
Note: the root is K-T-B and it means writing. KATABA is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means arrived writing. This in turn means wrote which can also means mandated or allowed.
Allahu: The GOD/Allah
Lakum: to you (plural)
Wakuloo: And eat
Note: WA means and. KULOO is derived from the root Hamza-K-L and it means eating/food. KULOO is an order form of a verb that is derived from the root and that addresses a group. It means literally, arrive food or arrive eating. This means eat.
Washraboo: And drink
Note: WA means and. SHRABOO is derived from the root SH-R-B and it means drinking or drink. SHRABOO is an order form of a verb that is addressing a group and it means arrive drink/arrive drinking. This in turn means drink.
Hatta: until
Yatabayyana: commences to become clarified
Note: the root is B-Y-N and it means between. This is the concrete. The abstract meaning will be clarification or clarifying as well as distance or even death. This is because all are betweens in one way or another. YATABAYYANA is the third person singular past tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means literally commences to become clarified.
Lakumu: to you (plural)
Alkhaytu: the thread
Note: the root is KH-Y-TTa and it means the thread in concrete or anything that connects between two objects or two pieces of cloth or so forth.
Alabyadu: the white/the light
Note: the root is B-Y-Dhad and it means egg. This is the concrete. In abstract it is used to mean things that share the shape of the egg or the color of the egg as white. Here, it is used to means white.
Mina: from
Alkhayti: the thread
Note: the root is KH-Y-TTa and it means the thread in concrete or anything that connects between two objects or two pieces of cloth or so forth.
Alaswadi: the black/the dark
Note: the root is S-W-D and it means dark/black or shaded. ALASWAD means the black/the shaded/the dark.
Mina: from/of
Alfajri: the dawn
Note: the root is F-J-R and it means dawn or the beginning of the light of the day. ALFAJR means the dawn or what preceeds the explosion of light of the day.
Thumma: then
Atimmoo: complete
Note: the root is T-M-M and it means completing/complete. ATIMMOO is an order form of a verb that is directed to a group of people. This verb means literally, make arrive completion. This means complete.
Assiyama: the fasting/the abstinence (from many things including food and drinks)
Note: the root is Sad-Y-M and it means abstinence or abstaining. This includes any form of abstaining including food, drink, speech and so forth. The word is used to mean fasting during the month of Ramadan but this should include other forms of abstaining to maintain the spirituality of the person. ASSIYAMU is the abstaining practice or the abstinence and that includes the fasting.
Ila: to
Allayli: the night
Note: the root is L-Y-L and it means night. ALLAYL means the night.
Wala: and not
Tubashiroohunna: mutually proceed with skin embracing skin with them (sexual contact.)
Note: The root is B-SH-R and it means the outer smooth skin. This is the concrete and the abstract means good news, beauty and so forth. TUBASHIROO is the second person plural addressing males in a verb that is derived from the root. This verb is interactive and it means arrive skin opposite skin. This gives the impression that the two skins are touching each other in a mutually interactive form. This is a vision of sexual contact. HUNNA means them and it is plural feminine. So, TUBASHIROOHUNNA means mutually proceed with skin embracing skin with them.
Waantum: And you
AAakifoona: Staying with dedication
Note: the root is Ain-K-F and it means staying in a place or with someone with the intent of that stay being for dedication to the person or the place. AAaKIFOONA means staying with dedication.
Fee: in
Almasajidi: the places of worship
Note: the root is S-J-D and it means the tree that is tilting downward due to the heavy load that it is carrying. Therefore, the meaning has the tilting downward as prostrating or lower the head so that the chin touches the neck. It also has the meaning of submitting to the load that is on us just as the tree does. So, in essence, it is the tilting downward or prostrating by accepting and submitting to the load on us and that the submission to GOD, ALMASAJID is the plural of MASJID and that is the place where one performs the act of prostrating to GOD in acceptance of GOD’a authority. They are then, the places of worship.
Tilka: those
Hudoodu: limits of
Note: the root is Ha-D-D and it means limit. HUDUDU are limits of.
Allahi: The GOD/ALLAH
HODUDU ALAHI then means the limits that GOD set.
Fala: therefore not
Taqrabooha: you (plural) come near her (the limits of GOD)
Note: the root is Qaf-R-B and it means near or nearing. TAQRABOO is the second person plural present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means become near or come near. HA means her and the her here points to the limits of the GOD.
Kathalika: Similarly
Yubayyinu: He clarifies and makes clarifying
Note: the root is B-Y-N and it means between. This is the concrete. The abstract meaning will be clarification or clarifying as well as distance or even death. This is because all are betweens in one way or another. YUBAYYINU is the third person singular present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means makes arrive clarification or makes become clarifying.
Allahu: The GOD/ALLAH
Ayatihi: HIS signs
Note: the root is Hamza-Y-H and it means signs. AYATI means signs of. HI means him and therefore AYATIHI means signs of HIM which is HIS signs.
Linnasi: to the people
Note: LI means to. NNASI is derived from the root Hamza-N-S and it means socializing. ANNASI are the society or the people because they are the ones that socialise
laAAallahum: perhaps they
yattaqoon: become conscious
Note: the root is W-Qaf-W and it means guarding. Since the best way to guard is through consciousness, then the meaning has consciousness in it. YATTAQOON is the third person plural present or future tense of a verb that is derived from the root. This verb means arrive consciousness to oneself or in shorter words become conscious.

Salaam all and have a great day

Hussein

2 comments:

Kabuki said...

Peace be with you. Could you please explain the meaning of مَعْدُودَاتٍ maʿdūdātin in 2:184 , I noticed that in 30:4 the word بِضْعِ biḍ'ʿi, seems to mean the same thing. Thank you Simone.

hussein said...

Thank you for your question. it is a very interesting question. Madoodat means that "counted or can be counted" So, the number is something that is easily counted no matter what it is. However, BIDII means some or a few and so while the one hearing the term Bidii may expect a few years the one who reads Madoodat does not necessary expect a low number of days as long as they are easily counted.