Tuesday, January 06, 2015

7:161

Salaam all,

Waith qeela lahumu oskunoo hathihi alqaryata wakuloo minha haythu shitum waqooloo hittatun waodkhuloo albaba sujjadan naghfir lakum khateeatikum sanazeedu almuhsineena
The Aya says:
And as it was said to them reside in this town and eat from it wherever you willed and say put down and enter the gate bowing/ prostrating, We shall protectively cover your sins. We shall provide more to the do gooders.
My personal note:
The term HITTATUN is derived from the root Ha-TTa-TTA and it means putting down or letting go and in this context it points to letting go or putting down of their sins. This includes accepting that they sinned and abandoning them and asking for them to be removed.

Enter the gate Sujjadan covers the possibility of enter a low gate bowing or prostrating on the floor as they enter the gate. Both meanings are linguistically correct and they could have been asked to do one or the other or both. There is a gate to the holy sanctuary of Jerusalem that carries this name the gate of Hitta.
Translation of the transliterated words:
Waith: and as
Qeela: was said/ it was said
Note: QEELA is derived from the root Qaf-W-L and it means saying in any way possible. QEELA is an action that is completed that is derived from the root. It means the action of saying happened by an undeclarted.

Lahumu: to them
Oskunoo: live/ reside/ settle
Note: the root is S-K-N and it means Ashes which is the product of the end of the fire. The conceptual meaning has many forms and it means rest or lack of movement and settling down, but it also means the lack of energy or running out of energy. OSKUNOO is an order or a request addressed to a group. It means: reside or settle.

Hathihi: this
Alqaryata: the village/ the town
Note: the root is Qaf-R-Y and it means the piece of land that is undivided or the body of water which collects water from the valleys and where people congregate to drink and water their animals. This is the concrete and it can be conceptually extended to mean town or village since the town or village is located where the water is located and it is a collection of people in it. ALQARYATI means: the village or town in here.
Wakuloo: and eat
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA often corresponds with “and/ addition” but the more encompassing meaning. KULOO is derived from the root Hamza-K-L and it means eating. This will then take different meanings depending on the different planes of thought that a person has. KULOO is an order or request addressed to a group. It means: Eat.
Minha: from it
Haythu: wherever
Shitum: you (plural) willed
Note: the root is Sh-Y-Hamza and it means entity. SHITUM is an action that is completed that is derived from the root. It means that the action of entitying happened by the subject (second person plural).
Waqooloo: and say
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA often corresponds with “and/ addition” but the more encompassing meaning. QOOLOO is derived from the root Qaf-W-L and it means saying in any way possible. QOOLOO is an order addressed to a plural. It means: Say.

Hittatun: putting down/ letting go
Note: the root is H-TTa-TTa and it means to put down. HITTATUN is a word that means Putting down or letting go. Here, they (the israelites are asked to say putting down of their sins).
Waodkhuloo: and enter
Note: WA is a letter that links what is before with what is after. This link is through inclusion, either one is included in the other or they are all included in the bigger sentence or bigger picture. WA often corresponds with “and/ addition” but the more encompassing meaning. ODKHULOO is derived from the root D-KH-L and it means entering. ODKHULOO is an order or a request addressed to a group of people. It means: enter.
Albaba: the door/ the gate
Note: the root is B-W-B and it means door or gate. ALBABA means the door or the gate.
sujjadan: prostrating/bowing
Note: the root is S-J-D and in concrete it means in one concrete form: a tree that is tilting downward due to a heavy load of fruits. It therefore is used conceptually to mean tilting downward of the face or the body including prostration as well as showing any sign of submission to a higher power. The range of meaning all those meanings together and one needs to understand it as both unless there is a strong reason in the sentence or elsewhere in the Qur’an to make one meaning inappropriate or impossible. SUJJADAN means in a state of submission or prostration.
Naghfir lakum: We will forgive you (plural)/ We will protectively cover for you (plural)
Note: NAGHFIR is derived from the root GH-F-R or GHAIN-F-R and it means covering for protection. The concrete word is the helmet of the fighter. GHAFOOR is the one that covers to protect. This, in turn means protection from committing the sin and protection from the consequences of sin, which also means forgiving. NAGHFIR is an action that is completed. It means: the action of protectively covering for the object or forgiving the object (LAKUM- to you plural) will happen once they do the act that was asked of them.
Khateeatikum: your errors/ your sins/ your sinful missteps
Note: The root is KH-TTA-HAMZA and it means error/mistake as a noun that can be of innocent cause of a product of sinful cause or leaving an important injunction. KHATATEEAT is the plural of KHTA. KUM means yours.
Sanazeedu: We shall increase/ We shall provide more

Note: the root is Z-Y-Dor Z-W-D and it means to increase as a verb and excess/more/increase as a noun. SANAZEED is a first person plural in the future sense of a verb that is derived from the root and that means We shall make (someone or a group of people) have more/ WE shall provide more to
almuhsineena: The ones that make things beautiful (mostly spiritually and somewhat physically)/The ones that make things good.
Note: the root is Ha-S-N and as a noun it means beautiful and good. As a verb it mean to become beautiful/good. MUHSINEEN is a plural noun used for the people that make things good/beautiful (spiritually and materially).

Salaam all and have a great day.

Hussien

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